Book Review: FreeBSD Mastery: Storage Essentials

January 19th, 2015 by Rob


Saint Aardvark writes If, like me, you administer FreeBSD systems, you know that (like Linux) there is an embarrassment of riches when it comes to filesystems. GEOM, UFS, soft updates, encryption, disklabels — there is a *lot* going on here. And if, like me, you’re coming from the Linux world your experience won’t be directly applicable, and you’ll be scaling Mount Learning Curve. Even if you *are* familiar with the BSDs, there is a lot to take in. Where do you start? You start here, with Michael W. Lucas’ latest book, FreeBSD Mastery: Storage Essentials. You’ve heard his name before; he’s written Sudo Mastery (which I reviewed previously), along with books on PGP/GnuPGP, Cisco Routers and OpenBSD. This book clocks in at 204 pages of goodness, and it’s an excellent introduction to managing storage on FreeBSD. From filesystem choice to partition layout to disk encryption, with sidelong glances at ZFS along the way, he does his usual excellent job of laying out the details you need to know without every veering into dry or boring. Keep reading for the rest of Saint Aardvark’s review.

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New committer: Jan Beich (ports)

January 19th, 2015 by Rob


Ask Slashdot: Migrating a Router From Linux To *BSD?

January 15th, 2015 by Rob


An anonymous reader writes I’m in the camp that doesn’t trust systemd. You can discuss the technical merits of all init solutions all you want, but if I wanted to run Windows NT I’d run Windows NT, not Linux. So I’ve decided to migrate my homebrew router/firewall/samba server to one of the BSDs. Question one is: which BSD? Question two: where’s some good documentation regarding setting up a home router/firewall on your favorite BSD?It’s fine if the documentation is highly technical, I’ve written linux kernel drivers before :)

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October–December, 2014 Status Report

January 15th, 2015 by Rob


The October–December, 2014 Status Report is now available.

OpenBSD’s Kernel Gets W^X Treatment On Amd64

January 14th, 2015 by Rob


New submitter brynet tips this news from Theo de Raadt: Over the last two months Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) modified the amd64 kernel to follow the W^X principles. It started as a humble exercise to fix the .rodata segment, and kind of went crazy. As a result, no part of the kernel address space is writeable and executable simultaneously. At least that is the idea, modulo mistakes. Final attention to detail (which some of you experienced in buggy drafts in snapshots) was to make the MP and ACPI trampolines follow W^X, furthermore they are unmapped when not required. Final picture is many architectures were improved, but amd64 and sparc64 look the best due to MMU features available to service the W^X model. The entire safety model is also improved by a limited form of kernel ASLR (the code segment does not move around yet, but data and page table ASLR is fairly good.”

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New committer: Muhammad Moinur Rahman (ports)

December 14th, 2014 by Rob


FreeNAS 9.3 Released

December 11th, 2014 by Rob


An anonymous reader writes This FreeNAS update is a significant evolutionary step from previous FreeNAS releases featuring: a simplified and reorganized Web User Interface, support for Microsoft ODX and Windows 2012 clustering, better VMWare integration, including VAAI support, a new and more secure update system with roll-back functionality, and hundreds of other technology enhancements. You can get it here and the list of changes are here. Existing 9.2.x users and 9.3 beta testers are encouraged to upgrade.

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DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

November 26th, 2014 by Rob


An anonymous reader writes From the release page: Version 4 of DragonFly brings Haswell graphics support, 3D acceleration, and improved performance in extremely high-traffic networks. DragonFly now supports up to 256 CPUs, Haswell graphics (i915), concurrent pf operation, and a variety of other devices.

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Ask Slashdot: Workaday Software For BSD On the Desktop?

November 20th, 2014 by Rob


An anonymous reader writes So for a variety of reasons (some related to recent events, some ongoing for a while) I’ve kinda soured on Linux and have been looking at giving BSD a shot on the desktop. I’ve been a Gentoo user for many years and am reasonably comfortable diving into stuff, so I don’t anticipate user friendliness being a show stopper. I suspect it’s more likely something I currently do will have poor support in the BSD world. I have of course been doing some reading and will probably just give it a try at some point regardless, but I was curious what experience and advice other slashdot users could share. There’s been many bold comments on slashdot about moving away from Linux, so I suspect I’m not the only one asking these questions. Use-case wise, my list of must haves is: Minecraft, and probably more dubiously, FTB; mplayer or equivalent (very much prefer mplayer as it’s what I’ve used forever); VirtualBox or something equivalent; Firefox (like mplayer, it’s just what I’ve always used, and while I would consider alternatives, that would definitely be a negative); Flash (I hate it, but browsing the web sans-flash is still a pain); OpenRA (this is the one I anticipate giving me the most trouble, but playing it is somewhat of an obsession). Stuff that would be nice but I can live without: Full disk encryption; Openbox / XFCE (It’s what I use now and would like to keep using, but I could probably switch to something else without too much grief); jackd/rakarrack or something equivalent (currently use my computer as a cheap guitar amp/effects stack); Qt (toolkit of choice for my own stuff). What’s the most painless way to transition to BSD for this constellation of uses, and which variety of BSD would you suggest?

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FreeBSD 10.1 Released

November 15th, 2014 by Rob


An anonymous reader writes Version 10.1 of the venerable FreeBSD operating system has been released. The new version of FreeBSD offers support for booting from UEFI, automated generation of OpenSSH keys, ZFS performance improvements, updated (and more secure) versions of OpenSSH and OpenSSL and hypervisor enhancements. FreeBSD 10.1 is an extended support release and will be supported through until January 1, 2017.

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